Hawaii deepwater bottomfish survey

Research Expedition SE1302: Deepwater Bottomfish Survey Methods Comparison in the Maui Triangle Region

Chief Scientist: Dr. Donald R. Kobayashi

The NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE is named for Dr. Oscar Elton Sette, the founding Director of the Honolulu Laboratory, which has since become the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.

The NOAA Ship Oscar Elton Sette will be serving as research base by a team of scientists from the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) in collaboration with colleagues from the Northwest Fisheries Science Center (NWFSC), University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM), Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (JIMAR), Pacific Islands Fisheries Group (PIFG), and the NOAA Teacher at Sea (TAS) program for cruise SE1302 (15-29 April, 2013). The Oscar Elton Sette is scheduled to initiate operations on April 15, 2013, and will conduct operations in the waters around the Maui Triangle (ocean region delineated by the islands of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kahoolawe).
A small research fleet of vessels will accomplish a near-simultaneous survey of deepwater bottomfish in the Maui Triangle region using Simrad EK60 active acoustics from Sette, autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) and remotely operated vehicle (ROV) camera systems deployed from Sette including a BlueView imaging sonar unit, baited underwater stereo video camera systems (BotCam) and fishing operations aboard contracted vessels. The Sette will conduct acoustic target ground-truthing experiments using ROV cameras and BlueView in conjunction with Simrad EK60 active acoustics.
These projects will be described on the PIFSC website at time of deployment. WWW.PIFSC.NOAA.Gov
Sette2

 

The NOAA Ship OSCAR ELTON SETTE is named for Dr. Oscar Elton Sette, the founding Director of the Honolulu Laboratory, which has since become the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center.

Acoustic

Output from the NOAA ship Oscar Elton Sette‘s acoustic device (above).

AUV

NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) (above).

BottCam

BottCam (above)

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