Indonesia moves toward an Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management

By Megan Moews

In a concerted effort to reach high-level officials throughout the Coral Triangle region, NOAA has now led 2-day training workshops titled “Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management for Leaders, Executives and Decision-makers” (EAFM LEAD) in 4 of the 6 Coral Triangle countries. This course was developed to increase the awareness and understanding of EAFM by senior decision makers—a need identified by resource managers who attended 3 EAFM 101 courses held in the Republic of Indonesia in April and May 2012 and echoed by country delegates at the Coral Triangle Initiative on Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI-CFF) EAFM Regional Exchange in May 2012. To this end, NOAA, Indonesia’s Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF), and the Indonesia Marine and Climate Support (IMACS) Project invited leaders from multiple ministries in Indonesia to take part in an EAFM LEAD workshop that took place in Jakarta on March 19–20.

Participants engaging in discussion during the workshop, “Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management for Leaders, Executives and Decision-makers,” held in in Jakarta, Indonesia, on March 19–20. NOAA photo by Megan Moews

Participants engage in discussion during the workshop, “Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management for Leaders, Executives and Decision-makers,” held in in Jakarta, Indonesia, on March 19–20. NOAA photo by Megan Moews

This training workshop provided an overview about what an EAFM is, why an EAFM is important, and guidelines on how to implement an EAFM. Most important, it was designed to provide leaders with a forum for discussion on movement toward an EAFM. Tailored to meet the some of the more advanced and demanding needs of Indonesia as one of the most diverse, abundant, and rapidly expanding fisheries in the world, the workshop was enhanced by experience and feedback from the EAFM LEAD workshops held before in Malaysia, Timor-Leste, and the Philippines.

Pak Muhammed Badrudin and Pak Purwanto of the Indonesia Marine and Climate Support Project and Rusty Brainard of the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Division hold up posters from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program, gifts for all of their hard work as facilitators and translators during the workshop held this March in Jakarta, Indonesia. NOAA photo by Megan Moews

Pak Muhammed Badrudin and Pak Purwanto of the Indonesia Marine and Climate Support Project and Rusty Brainard of the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Division hold up posters from NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program, gifts for their hard work as facilitators and translators during the workshop held this March in Jakarta, Indonesia. NOAA photo by Megan Moews

As part of the training course, Pak Hary Christijanto, of MMAF’s Capture Fisheries, gave a presentation on current legal and policy frameworks for fisheries management and an EAFM, and Pak Purwanto of IMACS Project gave a presentation on EAFM activities taking place in the Bali Strait. A large portion of the participants were involved in some way with WPP 573, a large fisheries management area that includes fisheries from Java, Indonesia, to Timor-Leste. NOAA has been asked to assist in the development of an overarching framework for ecosystem-based fisheries management planning and an associated spatial data framework for WPP 573. Throughout this workshop, WPP 573 was used as an example and discussed in the context of EAFM.

This workshop was supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), IMACS, MMAF, and NOAA’s Coral Reef Conservation Program and led by Dr. Rusty Brainard, Megan Moews, Dr. Adel Heenan, and Tomoko Acoba of the PIFSC Coral Reef Ecosystem Division and IMAC’s Pak Purwanto, Pak Muhammed Badrudin, Topan Renyaan, Peter Mous, and support staff Kiki Anggraini and Ray Chandrapurnama.

Representatives from the following organizations took part in this workshop (English translations follow agency names):

  • KKP: Kementerian Kelautan dan Perikanan (MMAF)
  • DJPT: Direktorat Jenderal Perikanan Tangkap (Directorate General of Capture Fisheries)
  • SDI: Direktorat Sumber Daya Ikan (Fish Resources Drectorate)
  • DIT PP: Direktorat Pelabuhan Perikanan (Ports Directorate of Fisheries)
  • PUSKITA: Kepala Pusat Analisis Kerja Sama Internasional Dan Antarenbaga (Center of Analysis for International Cooperation and Institution)
  • BALITBANG KP: Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan dan Perikanan (Agency of Research and Development for Marine and Fisheries)
  • P4KSI: Pusat Penelitian Pengelolaan Perikanan de Konservasi Sumberdaya Ikan (Research Center for Fisheries Management and Fisheries Resources Conservation)
  • BBPPI: Balai Besar Pengembangan Penangkapan Ikan (Fishing Technology Development Center)
  • BPPL: Balai Penelitian Perikanan Laut (Marine Fisheries Research Institute)
  • DKP: Dinas Kelautan dan Perikana (Fisheries offices at provincial and district levels)
  • BAPPENAS: Perencannan dan Pembangunan Nasional (State Ministry of National Development Center)
  • KEHUTANAN: Kemeterian Kehutanan  (Ministry of Forestry)
  • PHKA: Direktorat Jenderal Perlindungan Hutan Dan Konservasi Alam (Directorate General of Forest Protection and Nature Conservation)

These participants brought thoughtful and important concerns and ideas to the table and discussed potential steps that can be taken to move toward EAFM in Indonesia. We would like to extend our thanks to the IMACS team, MMAF, USAID, and these participants for the time and effort they put into making this EAFM LEAD workshop a success.

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