“I want to be a scientist when I grow up!”

by Amy Vandehey

“When I got accepted into the NOAA Fisheries Science Camp, I was so excited because I knew I was going to learn more about marine topics I was interested in. I really didn’t know what to expect, but I had an idea that NOAA did a lot of cool research all over the world because I do watch a lot of documentaries. I was very interested in what NOAA Fisheries does for our State of Hawai‘i, as well.” ~ Marlon, science camper

marlon_survey

Marlon and other campers learn about casting and the importance of data in fisheries management.

Expectations were high as the students filed out of the school bus one bright summer morning to attend the 2016 NOAA Fisheries Science Camp at the NOAA Inouye Regional Center in Honolulu. They had only seen a small preview of what was in store for them at the third annual summer camp, with the overarching theme, “Using Technology to Study Ocean Life and Ecosystems.”

A week of absorbing new skills and information come together in the final mystery scenario challenge. Here a camper completes her team's proposed research plan.

A week of absorbing new skills and information come together in the final mystery scenario challenge. Here a camper completes her team’s proposed research plan.

The NOAA-sponsored summer camp targeted incoming 8th grade students in underserved communities and charter schools on Oʻahu and was completely free for participants. The five-day camp consisted of six different science modules, a field trip to visit the Waikīkī Aquarium and conduct a beach cleanup, and culminated with an activity that challenged the students to use information and skills learned at camp to solve a mystery scenario.

Almost 40 NOAA Fisheries and JIMAR staff and interns developed and taught the science modules, while four Waikīkī Aquarium docents, three science teachers, and one oceanography undergraduate student volunteered their time to participate as camp small group leaders. Together, they provided a unique hands-on experience for the campers in current fisheries research areas, such as marine debris, fish sampling techniques and stock assessments, marine food webs, plankton, Hawaiian monk seals, and fisheries-dependent data.

In addition, a recent NOAA grant allowed a middle school science teacher, who was a camp small group leader in 2015, to develop educator’s kit lessons based off of the science modules. These kit lessons will bring NOAA science to students during the school year and contain lesson plans that meet Hawai‘i Department of Education standards, instructions, materials, and supplemental information that teachers can borrow for free.

A student identifies zooplankton under a microscope using a simple dichotomous key.

A student identifies zooplankton under a microscope using a simple dichotomous key.

After completing the 2016 camp, Marlon described his experience as opening a “wide window of opportunities”:

“One of the many parts of the science camp I enjoyed was the plankton module activities. We examined planktonic stages by viewing it through microscopes. I thought that was pretty cool because I was able to see the physical changes of plankton at each stage of their life cycle. The field trip to the Waikīkī Aquarium was also very memorable because after learning about the different tanks and research at the aquarium, we later then contributed to cleaning up trash from the beach side. It always feels great to help our community in various ways.

I’ve always wanted to be a scientist when I grow up. Fossils, dinosaurs, and marine animals are my greatest interests within the past few years. I really want to be a marine biologist, but I don’t know yet what specific area I would want to study or research. My experiences at NOAA Fisheries Science Camp just opened a wide window of opportunities for me.”

Campers, NOAA staff and small group leaders gather at the back of the NOAA IRC Building on the first day of camp.

Campers, NOAA staff and small group leaders gather at the back of the NOAA IRC Building on the first day of camp.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.