Creating a “Community” for the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument

by Hoku Johnson

How do managers effectively spread the word about the natural splendors of a large, extremely remote place?  Who is the “community” of people that will provide advice to NOAA and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service managers on development of a management plan for this place?  Why should anyone care about the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRIMNM)?

Wading toward the small boats after a day of manager-expert discussions.

Wading toward the small boats after a day of manager-expert discussions.

Sean Russell, Susan White, Callum Roberts and Leanne Fernandes discuss marine conservation while wading through the water at Palmyra Atoll.

Sean Russell, Susan White, Callum Roberts and Leanne Fernandes discuss marine conservation while wading through the water at Palmyra Atoll.

Last week, a small group of four experts and four marine managers set out to discuss these questions on Palmyra Atoll, a National Wildlife Refuge located within the PRIMNM, approximately 1,100 miles south of Honolulu.  Their main task: develop a community steering committee comprised of stakeholders that will be able to provide advice to managers on everything ranging from prioritizing research to figuring out creative ways to bring the wonders of these remote protected atolls and islands to the world.

Before diving into discussion, the group had the opportunity to dive into the ocean surrounding Palmyra Atoll to connect with the place and experience a kaleidoscope of corals, fishes, sharks, and turtles. The diving and snorkeling was amazing and reminded the group of why a community of advocates is important to such a remote area.

The group discusses building a community steering committee for the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

The group discusses building a community steering committee for the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

Once everyone dried off, the group–consisting of Dr. Callum Roberts, Dr. Leanne Fernandes, Mr. Sean Russell, Ms. Hoku Johnson, Mr. Matthew Brown, Ms. Samantha Brooke, Ms. Heidi Hirsh, Ms. Susan White, and facilitator Ms. Deanna Spooner–delved into topics including: sorting through relevant stakeholder groups, discussing the Presidential Proclamations that established and expanded PRIMNM, different ways a community steering committee might be convened, and priority topics this group would discuss in the future.

Juvenile coconut crab

Juvenile coconut crab

By the end of the week, the group finalized a draft framework for a community steering committee (dubbed the “PRIMNM CSC”) that will be fleshed out further by the NOAA and Fish and Wildlife Service managers over the next few months. The group celebrated their achievement by participating in a Palmyra Atoll Research Consortium beach barbecue and an evening “crab walk” looking for numerous species of crabs that live on Palmyra Atoll.

Refuge Manager Stefan Kropidlowski talks with the group about the native Pisonia tree behind him.

Refuge Manager Stefan Kropidlowski talks with the group about the native Pisonia tree behind him.

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